Breadsticks for #inktober #carbondeskpen #pentelpigmentinkbrushpen #waterbrush #magicblack

Breadsticks for #inktober #carbondeskpen #pentelpigmentinkbrushpen #waterbrush #magicblack

# pentelpigmentinkbrushpen # inktober # carbondeskpen # waterbrush # magicblack

Bromeo, oh Bromeo
I love you.. No homeo
Every Bro Ever  (via relijion)

(Source: frecklesandstitches)

reblogged from LGBTQ Blogs
nevver:

Whatever you say
reblogged from this isn't happiness.
raspbeary:

reimagined wonder woman

raspbeary:

reimagined wonder woman

reblogged from 2$P00KY
birchsoda:

nudiemuse:

lycantherapy:





Guys, I swear I had good intentions starting out.
I was thinking “Man, you know what we need? We need motivational werewolves.  Because really, people area awesome, and don’t know it, and no one would argue with a werewolf trying to motivate you.”
Then I realized “And if a werewolf was dishing out compliments, It would comment on how nice you smelled!”  And this was a good idea.  I plan on redoing this sometime along with some companion pieces.  It’s not the best, but good.   But then everything went wrong when I started drawing, and then, I had the horrible, awful, abysmal thought: “And I could draw it sort of in the style of Lisa Frank.  The art of my childhood.  Yesssssssssss.”   And… and I did this. This happened. I’m sorry.





OMG let me tell you guys a story.
I was out one day and at a coffee shop after running errands prework.
This enormous Super Metal Viking looking Mother fucker who is scowling like he is about to lay waste to Lower Queen Anne walks by me, (I was outside) stops, backs up and stares down at me.
I was feeling like maybe he was about to do something good and then he yelled in this big ass bass voice,
YOU SMELL REALLY NICE AND LOOK PRETTY.
Then stomped away.
I think he was a motivational werewolf because I was feeling gross and ugly and upset that day and that moment made everything okay.
LOL.
Thank you for making this OP and letting me remember.

Everything about this post us awesome.

birchsoda:

nudiemuse:

lycantherapy:

Guys, I swear I had good intentions starting out.

I was thinking “Man, you know what we need? We need motivational werewolves.  Because really, people area awesome, and don’t know it, and no one would argue with a werewolf trying to motivate you.”

Then I realized “And if a werewolf was dishing out compliments, It would comment on how nice you smelled!”  And this was a good idea.  I plan on redoing this sometime along with some companion pieces.  It’s not the best, but good. 

But then everything went wrong when I started drawing, and then, I had the horrible, awful, abysmal thought: “And I could draw it sort of in the style of Lisa Frank.  The art of my childhood.  Yesssssssssss.” 

And… and I did this.

This happened.

I’m sorry.

OMG let me tell you guys a story.

I was out one day and at a coffee shop after running errands prework.

This enormous Super Metal Viking looking Mother fucker who is scowling like he is about to lay waste to Lower Queen Anne walks by me, (I was outside) stops, backs up and stares down at me.

I was feeling like maybe he was about to do something good and then he yelled in this big ass bass voice,

YOU SMELL REALLY NICE AND LOOK PRETTY.

Then stomped away.

I think he was a motivational werewolf because I was feeling gross and ugly and upset that day and that moment made everything okay.

LOL.

Thank you for making this OP and letting me remember.

Everything about this post us awesome.
reblogged from Riding the Patriarchy's D
deducecanoe:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

Like why wouldn’t you want to actually communicate with y r kids? Apparently this should read that over 70% of hearing parents of deaf children are shitty assholes.

deducecanoe:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

Like why wouldn’t you want to actually communicate with y r kids? Apparently this should read that over 70% of hearing parents of deaf children are shitty assholes.

reblogged from So yeah...so

A Right to Representation

k-pagination:

This buzzfeed article on “Parenthood” and autism (what sparked my brain into logging out of my other Tumblr and back into this one to write this post) uses really problematic language, like ‘battling’ autism. Most Autistic people I know, including myself, don’t battle against it- we accept, embrace, and celebrate our neurotypes. Sometimes it is not a picnic, but no one’s life is a picnic, and we don’t have to like every aspect of our disability in order to embrace it and be proud.

It quotes no actually Autistic people and uses a quote from Autism Speaks, an organization that most Autistic people stand against for its propagation of myths such as Autistic people are broken, diseased, require normalization through methods such as ABA, and need a cure. It also uses person-first language (“with autism”) rather than identity-first language (“Autistic”).

I may be rehashing what people have said over and over again in numerous posts about representation in popular culture and about including our voices in articles and policies written about us. In no way am I, however, beating a dead horse. If I was beating a dead horse, there would be ideal representation, inclusion, and more listening to us (and even then, it might not be a dead horse because there would still be people trying to drag us back down).

There’s the thing where they write articles on us without talking to us. People gladly assume we do not like being disabled, or that we cannot communicate about being disabled. Sometimes, perhaps, they do know, and just decide to talk for us anyway. We deserve to be included; we have thoughts. Traditional manners of communication may not work for us, but we still have opinions. We all have the right to be a self-advocate and be heard.

Then there are films by disabled people about disability, but people seem to jump for the sensationalized, dramatized, and either tragic or magically-cured stories. This is why, for instance, the Kansas City chapter of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network created a petition for Netflix to include films about disability and chronic illness by actually disabled and chronically ill creators. They compiled a list of films by disabled and/or chronically ill creators here.

We shouldn’t have to make petitions about better representation, but we do, unfortunately. A lot of showrunners will deny their character is even Autistic because the character either “functions too well,” or they didn’t mean to write the character that way, or they don’t want the stigma of having an autistic character on the show. It’s often a combination of them. Disability in general also doesn’t fare so well. Disabled characters are often played by able-bodied actors, which leaves them able to ‘stand up’ or go off at the end of the show or film. Often we’re depicted as either violent or savant. Often we get cured, get killed, or die in some fashion.

These depictions lend themselves to stigma in multiple ways. People can be afraid of us because we’re not making eye contact or doing “strange” hand gestures or pacing. People expect us to be savants when most of us are not – giving the idea that we’re only worth something if we have some miraculous skill someplace “despite” the disability. Cures imply we need them. Our deaths imply that death is a fate kinder than disability.

This is not just an issue that affects disability; it is intersectional and should be treated as such by all marginalized groups. We are one of a marginalized people and culture. Queer people, trans people, PoC, women, religious minorities and other groups also have a lot to work for in the field of representation. We should just make a collaborative series of films between disabled people, trans people, queer people, women, PoC, and as many religious minority groups as possible, and other groups too… because we all have a right to representation.

reblogged from Pagination Imagination
I tried a thing! The thing worked! Maybe it will work for you? (via Cleaning the tub has never been easier - Disabled Psych)
givncvrlos:

Hong Kong Verticality by Reuben Wu on Flickr.
reblogged from
roachpatrol:

blazepress:

The level.

i’m very angry and very impressed

roachpatrol:

blazepress:

The level.

i’m very angry and very impressed

reblogged from DISCLOSER
heyfunniest:

Someone took a candid photo of a fight in Ukranian Parliament that is as well-composed as the best renaissance art.

heyfunniest:

Someone took a candid photo of a fight in Ukranian Parliament that is as well-composed as the best renaissance art.

reblogged from Torako's Opinions
reblogged from memory splinters of joy & mild horror
reblogged from Asylum Art
somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”
King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.
“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”
Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.

somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”

King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.

“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”

Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.

(Source: pizza-grrrl)

reblogged from Primadraggle

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